palaceonwheelsindia

Navya Verma Verma من عند نيويورك من عند نيويورك

قارئ Navya Verma Verma من عند نيويورك

Navya Verma Verma من عند نيويورك

palaceonwheelsindia

This is one of those books that has travelled with me all my life. Not only physically, AS a book, but as an idea. It was the first anthology I read as a kid, and the first time I read so many 'behind the scenes' articles about the actual people behind these stories. It was a book of stories about subjects I certainly didn't think much about at that age, as my exposure to SF was monster movies, Star Trek, Star Wars and the like. So seeing that there were other levels to genre fiction was just one of the rewards of this book. Another was that it gave me permission to have opinions about what other people--writers, editors, reviewers--claimed about books. Ellison's intros and the authors' afterwords were a discussion happening on the page, one I was invited into. For a kid to read stories and also discussion about them by the actual writers--as opposed to some textbook lecturing me about what this book meant--was liberating. As I got older and read old interviews and essays, read the second volume of the never-completed trilogy, I started to think that maybe this book and the 'controversial' stories weren't all that. Some of them were just shocking, some of them pushed ideas I didn't think were all that important or controversial, and some, like the Del Rey, Knight and Bloch stories, seemed to be all warm-up to not much pay-off. Over time, as I began to sell my own short stories, I started to think these big names needed to be told when they were cruising. The Knight and Del Rey stories in particular seem to be little more than their messages about the meaninglessness or awfulness of God. They weren't really stories. Ellison himself actually illustrates the difference. While Robert Bloch's "A Toy for Juliette" is written in a very interesting way (I still recall my own imaginary version of that room), it's all a buildup to a punchline, something Bloch was guilty of sometimes. He's still a great writer whose memoir is one of the key books in a troubled time of my life, but the style of this story (not all of his, no way, he was indeed a fantastic writer) leading up to a zinger left me very unsatisfied--the ideas that should be explored here and in the Knight and Del Rey stories and others are not explored at all, but simply stated. It's as if they believed that daring to write a story about these subjects was enough, no actual story had to be told. Ellison picked up the ball Bloch fumbled and constructed one of his most unjustly-ignored short stories. He showed how one takes these 'controversial' ideas and makes stories, not just punchlines. So for a period I dismissed this book. The stories were old-hat, some of them were just okay, I was beyond that stuff. Yet I came back and learned to appreciate the craftsmanship of those involved. The stories by Miriam Allen DeFord, Philip Jose Farmer, Samuel Delany and many others are just flat-out great stories. As I've taken another look at the book, I understood that writing to shock is just as legitimate a goal as any. One of the labels I've found annoying in reference to books and films of decades past is 'dated,' as if a work of art can't be worth one's time if it was about its own time. Some of the stories here are indeed dated, but it's funny how something called dated manages to be pertinent again--when the world continues to change, as it always does. Very few works of art are always timely, and many, many bad works of art are ones the creators tried to make 'universal.' These are individual stories, written by writers who had certain things they wanted to talk about, in a time of great change in the world. There are so many voices, so many ideas, so much entertainment in this one book, that I can't ignore that it has been part of my life for decades, and it's been so because it has great value.