mauriceblaine

Maurice Blaine Blaine من عند Rajnagar, بنجلاديش من عند Rajnagar, بنجلاديش

قارئ Maurice Blaine Blaine من عند Rajnagar, بنجلاديش

Maurice Blaine Blaine من عند Rajnagar, بنجلاديش

mauriceblaine

i really like this series, its derivative but its supposed to be, interesting look at fact/ficiton/fantasy...

mauriceblaine

After finishing the first four pieces of Barry Lopez’s Resistance, I would say the greatest, most comprehensive form of resistance is simply to love. Of course, loving manifests itself in all sorts of particularities which could be speculated and explored—and should be and will be and have been—but for now arriving at this simple yet demanding answer is a good beginning. Another note: in each of Lopez’s stories so far, resistance does not take the traditional forms we expect: protest, investigation, rallying or overt mobilizing. These are powerful things, but also in some ways limiting. In fact, Lopez’s fictional introduction-writer, Owen Daniels, in the opening piece, “Apocalypse,” writes that these artists of the resistance will not offer “another map to the kingdom of your frauds,” and that “no hierarchy is worth figuring out.” Rather, Daniels writes, “We believe in the divinity of life, in all its human variety [. . .] that anyone can be redeemed,” and that “we will champion what is beautiful, and so finally make our opponents irrelevant.” Ultimately of course, the most intense and disruptive beauty is that of love being enacted, and the majority of these stories find their denouement in some form—direct or indirect—of love finally being understood, received, and embraced. And upon having completed this edifying work: The stories in this fictional collection are told by a variety of individuals, dispersed around the globe and committed to sharing voices that contrast sharply with the values of the ruling hegemony. Little imagination is needed to consider the current United States (now or eventually) as this controlling empire. Each of these stories is told in such a way that the reader feels a secret is being revealed. This may be some previously unrevealed aspect of a character’s interior life or may hint at some overlooked aspect of what it means to exist—fully alive—in perpetual and keen awareness of the wells of blessing we pass by each day. I can’t claim to have understood fully what the “secret” was at the conclusion of each piece, but this sense of confidentiality lends a kind of suspense and tension that kept me curious and gratefully delighted as each individual story unfolded. Finally, in a work of 163 pages, I wrote down 143 vocabulary words, many of which I had never seen before and many of which I needed to confirm or clarify meanings. Worthy of deliberate and contemplative reading. Thank you, Barry Lopez, and I look forward to more of your words and stories.